Krystal & The Queers come out in support of ISPCC ahead of fabulous Cork fundraiser

On May 19, Cork will be buzzing as Krystal & The Queers take to the stage at the city’s Gaia bar on 98th Street for a night of fun and frolics with all funds raised going to ISPCC. 

The Cork drag scene is thriving and the unforgettable performances of Krystal Queer and her fellow drag queens Liam Bee and Kia Koke are inspired by the New York club vibe of the 1980s and 1990s. 

Prepare to be surprised as Krystal Queer herself has said that you never know what you’re going to get with her. Characters such as Meg Griffin and Marge Simpson may even make special guest star appearances…

All will be revealed on May 19th. 

ISPCC, and its suite of Childline services including the 24/7 listening service, is a cause very dear to Krystal Queer. 

“This fundraiser holds a special place in my heart as when I was younger, I was deeply affected by the suicide of a friend. Unfortunately, a legion of others can say the same. We want to turn that grief into a positive force and aid Childline by doing what we do best – laughing, dancing and celebrating life. 

“Countless young people suffer in silence and darkness so we are pledging to be as loud and as bright as we can be. Everyone’s mental health matters – whether you’re a dentist, a driver or a drag queen.”

Doors open at 6.30pm, the performance starts at 7.30pm and will be followed by a DJ. Tickets priced at €10 are available on Eventbrite https://www.eventbrite.ie/e/drag-show-in-aid-of-childline-tickets-619861310867?aff=ebdssbdestsearch or at the door. 

A raffle on the night includes such fantastic prizes as one night B&B at the luxury four-star Kingsley Hotel, a €50 Spitjack voucher and much more.

ISPCC needs to raise over 75% of its funding through donations each year to ensure we can be there to support children and young people 24-hours a day, 365 days of the year.  We rely on the generosity of the public and are grateful for all support. We encourage children to reach out for any reason. To donate to ISPCC, https://www.idonate.ie/event/dragshowchildline



ISPCC’s free Space from Anxiety programme is the right prescription for increasing numbers of young people suffering from anxiety

“This programme really helped me to overcome my feeling of depression and low self-esteem,” said one user of ISPCC’s free Space from Anxiety programme, who added that “I could identify the possible triggers and take the necessary actions to relieve them, as opposed to them spiralling out of control and morphing into a mass of negativity.”

Volunteers at ISPCC’s 24/7 Childline Listening service have experienced a rise in conversations amongst children seeking support in relation to anxiety and feelings of low mood and unhappiness. Anxiety is a topic frequently discussed by children who speak with Childline both online and on the phone, says ISPCC Chief Executive John Church. 

For those children and young people suffering from low to moderate anxiety, ISPCC can offer a solution – Space from Anxiety. This is a free online CBT-based programme created by SilverCloud, a leading digital mental health provider. ISPCC provides three separate but complimentary Digital Mental Health and Wellbeing programmes, one of which is designed for teenagers experiencing anxiety and two are available to parents/carers of either anxious children or teens. 

Space from Anxiety is aimed at 14–18-year-olds, and it is designed to empower young people who experience low to moderate anxiety. Supporting an Anxious Child and Supporting an Anxious Teen are programmes that will help users to understand anxiety and better support their child or young person. 

The programme includes interactive tools, activities, mood monitors and journals to encourage users to apply CBT to their own lives. Throughout the duration of the early intervention programme, users will be supported by fully trained ISPCC volunteers. 

Dee Higgins, an ISPCC volunteer, believes that the programme is empowering for users of all ages. “It gives parents and young people a chance to deal with their anxieties before it becomes a huge issue,” she said, adding that “if parents can understand what their child is going through, that’s a huge step.” 

Users have 12 weeks in which to complete the programme under the guidance of a volunteer and can benefit from an unsupported version of the programme for one year after this time. 

There are several ways to access the programmes including making a self-referral through a GP, CAMHS or school.

Dee Higgins says that volunteers build a relationship with users as they support them. “It’s a great resource, there are so many children and young people suffering from anxiety and it gives them a chance to learn the skills to introduce into their day-to-day life and help them deal with anxiety, recognise how they are feeling and understand the physical effects they feel from anxiety. 

“Following the programme starts them on the journey to learning the skills to help themselves and others and that’s something they can use for the rest of their lives.”

How ISPCC can help parents of children suffering from anxiety

ISPCC and author and illustrator Katie O’Donoghue are continuing their successful series of free webinars for parents and teachers that will provide them tools and tips to help bolster children’s resilience and manage anxiety.  

The first in the series which was aimed at parents, focussed on resilience, while the next webinar, taking place on April 25, will help parents to support children suffering with anxiety.     

 At ISPCC, we know what is worrying children and young people in Ireland; we know what is on their minds and we know how to support them. Through this series of bespoke webinars, parents and teachers will learn skills and strategies for children between five and 12 years of age who are feeling anxious.    

 ISPCC parenting leads Siobhan Harvey and Niamh Clarke will be joined by author, illustrator and art psychotherapist Katie O’Donoghue, whose second book The Little Otter Who Tried has recently been published by Gill Books.    

The Little Otter Who Tried is a beautifully illustrated book that aims to teach children valuable lessons about self-care, resilience and how to ask for help; vital lessons that will be covered throughout the webinar series. Participants will also gain a better understanding of anxiety, as well as increased knowledge of coping skills to support children and a toolkit of resources.   

 

Webinar details are:  

 Parents – Managing Anxiety  

April 25th, 7-8pm  

Teaching Professionals  

May 9th, 3-3:30pm where both building resilience and managing anxiety will be covered. 

Participants who register on ispcc.ie will also be in with a chance to win a signed copy of The Little Otter Who Tried.   

 

ISPCC | Childline.ie and acclaimed author and illustrator Katie O’Donoghue to host series of free resilience-boosting webinars

Digital sessions will equip parents and teachers of primary school children with tools to bolster resilience and provide tips to help manage anxiety 

March 14, 2023 – ISPCC and author and illustrator, Katie O’Donoghue are set to host a series of free webinars for parents and teachers that will provide them tools and tips to help bolster children’s resilience and manage anxiety.  The first in the series which is primarily for parents, will take place on March 28th, 2023.    

 

At ISPCC, we know what is worrying children and young people in Ireland; we know what is on their minds and we know how to support them. Through this series of bespoke webinars, parents and teachers will learn skills and strategies for children between five and 12 years of age who are feeling anxious and who would benefit from a boost in confidence to strengthen their resilience.   

 

ISPCC parenting leads will be joined by author, illustrator and art psychotherapist Katie O’Donoghue, whose second book The Little Otter Who Tried has recently been published by Gill Books.   

 

The Little Otter Who Tried is a beautifully illustrated book that aims to teach children valuable lessons about self-care, resilience and how to ask for help; vital lessons that will be covered throughout the webinar series. Participants will also gain a better understanding of resilience, as well as increased knowledge of coping skills to support children and a toolkit of resources.  

 

Webinar details are: 

Parents – Building Resilience 

March 28th, 7-8pm 

Parents – Managing Anxiety 

April 25th, 7-8pm 

Teaching Professionals 

May 9th, 3-3:30pm where both topics will be covered.

Participants who register will also be in with a chance to win a signed copy of The Little Otter Who Tried. 

To register, follow this link: https://events.teams.microsoft.com/event/49460a06-62b8-4f94-8102-223b6006935e@bb926d5e-af5f-4830-b812-e4d184987285

 

ISPCC response to the sentencing today of a man and woman who have been jailed over the rape and abuse of her children


“ISPCC shares the shock and distress felt by so many on hearing the horrifying details of rape and abuse carried out by a man and a woman on her young children following their sentencing at the Central Criminal Court today.  

Fiona Jennings, ISPCC, Head of Policy and Public Affairs said: “Parents and those in a parenting role are expected to protect their children and keep them safe, yet in this case it is clear from the sentences handed down that these children did not experience such protection. 

 “We join with Mr Justice David Keane in paying tribute to the young children at the centre of the case who showed such bravery in recounting the horrendous abuse they were subjected to at such a young age.” 

 ISPCC welcomes the lengthy sentences handed down to both perpetrators of this shocking abuse and strongly condemns the heinous crimes carried out against these young children. Any child who has been sexually abused must be offered and receive support in a timely manner.  

 The specialist interviewers must also be commended for their diligence in gathering such harrowing testimony to secure such a substantial sentence. However, it is not acceptable that it took eight years to get to trial and for the children to have to wait such a lengthy period to access justice.  

 ISPCC reiterates its call for the Government to commit with haste to a national strategy for child sexual abuse as recommended by the Report of the Garda Síochána Inspectorate, Responding to Child Sexual Abuse, 2017. 

 It is generally accepted that the number of cases of abuse in this country are grossly under-reported and the ISPCC strongly encourages anyone who has concerns about a child to help them disclose these horrific crimes to the authorities.  

 Such crimes can be reported by contacting An Garda Síochána’s Child Sexual Abuse Reporting Phone Line, which is a dedicated phone line for the reporting of child sexual abuse, on 1800 555 222.   

Children must always be protected, and we must do everything we can to ensure that we live in a society that puts children and their needs and rights at the heart of all we do. 

ISPCC delighted to see one of its key recommendations included in the report by the Committee on Education, Further and Higher Education, Research, Innovation and Science on Mental Health Supports in Schools and Tertiary Education

ISPCC delighted to see one of its key recommendations included in the report by the Committee on Education, Further and Higher Education, Research, Innovation and Science on Mental Health Supports in Schools and Tertiary Education

ISPCC welcomes the publication of the Committee on Education, Further and Higher Education, Research, Innovation and Science’s report on Mental Health Supports in Schools and Tertiary Education.

We are pleased to see the Committee take on a recommendation from ISPCC that the youth mental health pathfinder project be commenced without further delay. ISPCC was a member of the Youth Mental Health Taskforce where this recommendation was originally mooted back in 2017. 

“We firmly believe that if we are to solve the crisis of our child and adolescent mental health service, the initiation of this unit is crucial. This week has seen the harrowing state of CAMHS being brought into focus in the interim report of the Mental Health Commission,” says CEO John Church. “The UN Committee on the Rights of the Child in its State examination of Ireland struggled to understand how we have such long waiting lists for these services.”

The initiation of the unit would address the relevant gaps and challenges in this cross-cutting area, ultimately improving whole of government approach. 

Furthermore, we believe that it’s essential that mental health be a core focus of the next national policy framework for children and young people, with funding ring-fenced for both universal and targeted services. 

It is fantastic to see the Education Committee recommend that ring-fenced funding be made available to non-statutory mental health supports for students to address the overflow of demand on the statutory services and to reduce waiting times. ISPCC provides many services already that could support Government to meet such a demand.

We are grateful that our Childline service was recognised by Mr Justice Clarence Nelson at the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child in Geneva at Ireland’s State examination. We are here for all children and they can reach out for any reason.

ISPCC has supported children, young people and families since its inception in 1956 and next month it will be 35 years since its flagship service, Childline, began. Since then, Childline has developed with the times and now offers a suite of multi-channel services delivered both face-to-face and non-face-to-face, responding to the needs of children and young people. 

We are delighted to see that the Committee recommends that wellbeing supports be an integral part of the curriculum and that there be mandatory training on many areas including bullying.  This is a key policy area for ISPCC and we developed our Shield Anti-Bullying programme as a direct response to the issue of bullying and how it was impacting the mental and emotional health and wellbeing of children. 

We were delighted to collaborate with DCU’s Anti-Bullying Centre and our Irish Safer Internet Centre partners Webwise on the Shield programme

For real reform in the area of child and youth mental health, it is imperative that we understand the issues at play, that all relevant stakeholders work together and that the requisite resources are put in place. 

 

Notes to Editors:

ISPCC Head of Policy and Public Affairs Fiona Jennings is available for comment or interview. 

For more information, please contact Rowena Walsh, ISPCC Marketing and Communications Coordinator. Tel: 087 3157552 

Email: [email protected]

About ISPCC

ISPCC is a national charity dedicated to enhancing the lives of children and young people; they are at the heart of everything we do.  We provide the Childline suite of services. 

Our child-centred services, programmes and supports are focused on strengthening resilience and developing coping competencies.  

 Any child or young person in Ireland up to and including those aged 18 years of age can contact Childline’s 24-hour support line by live chat – Childline.ie or calling 1800 66 66 66.

Our 24/7 Childline listening support service involves professionally trained facilitators actively listening, supporting and empowering children and young people. Our Childline Therapeutic Support Services offers children and young people a more long-term, personalised individual plan of support depending on their level of need and presenting issues. 

ISPCC’s Digital Mental Health and Wellbeing programmes aim to reduce anxiety for children and young people, as well as helping their parents/carers to manage their own anxiety while supporting their anxious child or teenager. These CBT-based programmes have been developed by SilverCloud, a leading digital mental health provider.

Smart Moves is our evidence-based resilience programme specifically focused on the transition from primary school to post-primary school. Best practice tells us that students need to be supported not just before they transition from primary school to post-primary school, but also during and after.

ISPCC response to the release of the interim report by the Mental Health Commission into the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS)

ISPCC response to the release of the interim report by the Mental Health Commission into the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS)

ISPCC shares the sense of shock felt by many on the publication of the interim report by the Mental Health Commission into the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS). 

The finding that CAMHS has left more than 100 children without care for up to two years is, as Tánaiste Micheál Martin says, ‘unacceptable’. 

In light of these findings, it is timely that Minister O’Gorman and his officials will be examined by the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child in Geneva tomorrow and Wednesday. Mental health will be a key focus there, as it needs to be at home. 

The fact that the Mental Health Commission felt compelled to publish an interim report on CAMHS is illustrative of the crisis facing the service. Yet, sadly, this is not a surprise for those of us working to support children and young people. 

For many parents/carers, it comes as a relief when their child is receiving support from CAMHS. “However, we read that some of these children are ‘lost children’ within the system,” says Fiona Jennings, ISPCC Head of Policy and Public Affairs. 

“It is truly frightening that children who have been on medication are not receiving ongoing assessments to ascertain the impact of such medication on their mental health and behaviour. In such circumstances, how can it be judged whether these interventions are making a meaningful and positive difference to the mental health of the child or young person?” 

The ability of CAMHS to provide a meaningful service is also hampered by staffing issues and the slow pace of digital transformation. A digital system that allows for timely monitoring and continuity of care is essential. As it stands, the system is utterly broken, despite the best efforts of those working within it. 

While we will always need CAMHS, it needs to be considered what can actually be done with the service in the short term to alleviate this current crisis, and we strongly suggest that there is a rethink of the CAMHS service delivery model; children and young people ought to be able to avail of such a service when and where they need it.  

At ISPCC, mental health concerns are one of the primary reasons why children and young people contact us. Calls on mental and emotional health was a top profile in our 24/7 Childline Listening Service over the Christmas period. 

Children have a right to appropriate care, and at ISPCC we know the importance of prevention and early intervention. 

We call on the Government to commit to a policy of both targeted and universal investment in mental health service provision. It needs to be a core focus in the next national children’s strategy. 

ISPCC reiterates its call for the Government to commit with haste to the implementation of the Pathfinder interdepartmental unit on youth mental health in order to align and streamline the mental health supports across various government departments. 

Notes to Editors:

ISPCC Head of Policy and Public Affairs Fiona Jennings is available for comment or interview. 

 

For more information, please contact Rowena Walsh, ISPCC Marketing and Communications Coordinator. Tel: 087 3157552 

Email: [email protected]

 

About ISPCC

ISPCC is a charity dedicated to enhancing the lives of children and young people.

The charity provides a suite of Childline services and supports for children and young people up to and including those aged 18 years of age.  Childline’s 24-hour support line can be contacted for FREE, 365 days a year 24/7.  Children can chat online at childline.ie or call 1800 66 66 66.

ISPCC provide services, supports and programmes for parents/carers and those working or volunteering in child and youth settings e.g. schools, clubs, crèches etc.

Our CBT-based programmes by Silvercloud, a leading digital mental health provider, Supporting an Anxious Child and Supporting an Anxious Teen provide essential support for parents/carers and teens experiencing anxiety.