Looking for info on cyberbullying

Looking for info on cyberbullying. I’m a parent

Answer

Hi there,

Many thanks for getting in touch with Ask Robyn asking about cyber bullying. Bullying of any kind is often difficult to address and understand and cyber bullying further adds to this complication.

By definition, cyber bullying is “the use electronic and digital means to deliberately harass, ridicule or hurt another person or group of people. It can be an extension of face-to-face bullying when technology such as social media platforms, text messages or email are used to deliberately hurt others” (www.youth.ie/programmes/projects-initiatives/web-safety-in-youth-work/cyberbullying-inappropriate-content/ )

One of the areas of complexity when bullying is online is that it can be difficult to identify with certainty who the perpetrator or bully really is.

It is important to talk about cyber bullying with you child or young person so that they know what to look out for and how to respond. It is important that they know that no one has the right to be mean to them or make them feel unsafe online. Remind them if this ever happens, to not reply and talk to a trusted adult as soon as they can.

The National Youth Council of Ireland (highlighted above) and some other services also provide support with addressing and understanding cyber bullying: www.spunout.ie ; www.webwise.ie ; Cyberbullying – HSE.ie .

We also have some articles on our website that you may find helpful for further understand: www.ispcc.ie/a-glossary-of-cyber-bullying-terms-every-parent-should-know-about/ ; www.ispcc.ie/how-parents-schools-can-prevent-cyberbullying/ ; www.ispcc.ie/online-risks-and-cyberbullying-videos/ ; www.ispcc.ie/cyberbullying-facts-signs-supports/ ;

It is important that cyber bullying is reported, depending on the information you have available may impact who, where or how you report it. This may be to school or the gardai. You may wish to discuss this further and if so you can contact ISPCC’s Support Line which can be contacted by email to [email protected] by phone from Monday to Friday 9am – 1pm on 01 522 4300.

Take care,

Robyn

Ask us a question

You can ask us about anything you want, there’s nothing too big or small.

Who are our children talking to online, asks ISPCC as it launches new campaign ahead of Safer Internet Day 2024.

ISPCC has developed a new ad campaign alerting parents to the dangers of online grooming in the run up to Safer Internet Day on February 6.

One thing we know for sure is that the online landscape is ever-changing, and that’s a scary prospect for even the most tech-savvy of parents.

We have released a range of helpful articles and videos on our Digital Ready Hub, and Parenting Hub to help equip parents with the tools to teach their children how to stay safe when they’re online while also encouraging them not to fear new technology. 

We are also delighted to bring you this FREE webinar series to coincide with Safer Internet Day 2024. These webinars aim to support families and their young people to be safe online. 

Register below:

  • ‘Don’t teach your kids to fear the online world, teach them to navigate It’ Parents webinar, Wednesday, February 7, 7pm to 8pm. Click here to register
  • “Don’t fear the online world, navigate it’ Parents and young people webinar, Thursday, February 8, 7pm to 7.30pm. Click here to register

Parents, face your fears, teach your children to be safe online with FREE webinars from ISPCC

January 22, 2024

New year, new you, new evolutions in the online world. One thing we know for sure is that the online landscape is ever-changing, and that’s a scary prospect for even the most tech-savvy of parents. 

But ISPCC can help equip you with the tools to teach your children how to stay safe when they’re online while also encouraging them not to fear new technology. 

ISPCC parenting lead Siobhan Harvey and Niamh Clarke, Manager of ISPCC Smart Moves programme, are hosting a one-hour webinar designed to help parents to learn more about online safety and to develop the key skills necessary to support their child. 

But it is also important to involve your child in learning how to safely navigate online. So the following day, ISPCC is hosting a second, 30-minute webinar aimed at children aged 12 years and over accompanied by a parent.

The aim of this series of webinars is to help parents and carers to recognise ways to interact with your child’s online world and day-to-day experiences and to allow young people to discuss their feelings in a safe space.

Our goal is to encourage parents to reflect on how you might support your child to navigate the online world, as well as implement digital boundaries. We will provide guidance on how parents and young people can deal with cyberbullying and upsetting content online and we will offer practical solutions and tips to help your child stay safe online.

ISPCC’s webinars will provide a non-judgemental place to ask questions, while also offering key take-aways in bite-size, easily digestible chunks. 

We at ISPCC know only too well the importance of staying safe online. Children and young people tell us their concerns through our 24/7 Childline listening service, through our therapeutic services and through our Shield Anti-Bullying programme. 

We understand that parents, carers and young people are concerned that our increasing reliance on digital technologies are exacerbating feelings of anxiety and depression among our youth, and we’re here to listen and to help.

Webinar details are:  

  • Parents webinar, Wednesday, February 7, 7pm to 8pm. Click here to register
  • Parents and young people webinar, Thursday, February 8, 7pm to 7.30pm. Click here to register